New book documents how science is saving the Tasmanian devil

Tasmanian devil
Dr Carolyn Hogg

To coincide with this year’s recent National Threatened Species Day on 7 September, a launch was held for a new book that offers an update on the campaign to save the Tasmanian devil, which has experienced a dramatic reduction in its population.

The book, Saving the Tasmanian devil: Recovery through Science-based Management, documents the discovery by partner organisations in the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program (STDP) of Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) and aspects of devil conservation in general.

“This includes captive devil populations, applied pathology, immunology and genetic research findings, adaptive management, and the importance of advocacy and partnerships,” said co-editor Dr Carolyn Hogg, research manager of the Australasian Wildlife Genomics Group at the University of Sydney.

“This book will provide management practitioners and conservation scientists with insight into the complexities of undertaking a program of this scale and will also be of value to researchers, students and others interested in conservation.”

Co-editor Professor Katherine Belov AO from the University of Sydney summarised the efforts of all the authors in the book.

“This book shows how to integrate science with adaptive management practice and is a road map for future conservation programs,” she said.

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